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mossfull:

Mossless Issue 1 has been selected by Rachel Morrison and David Senior of the MoMA to be a part of Millenium Magazines, opening Monday February 20th in their Library building. As one of the 100 experimental magazines that are being showcased I think I can speak for all of us and say that we’re really excited for this. From their website:

This survey of experimental art and design magazines published since 2000 explores the various ways in which contemporary artists and designers utilize the magazine format as an experimental space for the presentation of artworks and text. Throughout the 20th century, international avant-garde activities in the visual arts and design were often codified first in the informal context of a magazine or journal. This exhibition, drawn from the holdings of the MoMA Library, follows the practice into the 21st century. The works on view represent a broad array of international titles within this genre, from community-building newspapers to image-only photography magazines to conceptual design projects. The contents illustrate a diverse range of image-making, editing, design, printing, and distribution practices. There are obvious connections to the past lineage of artists’ magazines and little architecture and design magazines of the 20th century, as well as a clear sense of the application of new techniques of image-editing and printing methods. Assembled together, these contemporary magazines provide a first-hand view into these practices and represents the MoMA Library’s sustained effort to document and collect this medium.

mossfull:

Mossless Issue 1 has been selected by Rachel Morrison and David Senior of the MoMA to be a part of Millenium Magazines, opening Monday February 20th in their Library building. As one of the 100 experimental magazines that are being showcased I think I can speak for all of us and say that we’re really excited for this. From their website:

This survey of experimental art and design magazines published since 2000 explores the various ways in which contemporary artists and designers utilize the magazine format as an experimental space for the presentation of artworks and text. Throughout the 20th century, international avant-garde activities in the visual arts and design were often codified first in the informal context of a magazine or journal. This exhibition, drawn from the holdings of the MoMA Library, follows the practice into the 21st century. The works on view represent a broad array of international titles within this genre, from community-building newspapers to image-only photography magazines to conceptual design projects. The contents illustrate a diverse range of image-making, editing, design, printing, and distribution practices. There are obvious connections to the past lineage of artists’ magazines and little architecture and design magazines of the 20th century, as well as a clear sense of the application of new techniques of image-editing and printing methods. Assembled together, these contemporary magazines provide a first-hand view into these practices and represents the MoMA Library’s sustained effort to document and collect this medium.


(via mossfull)

What is Publication? A talk by Matthew Stadler (by Publication Studio)

bombmagazine:

This is a great discussion for folks interested in digital age publishing, wish we could have made it!

mcnallyjackson:

Missed our (Re)making Media panel on DIY, zines, punk rock, gen X and millenials in the digital age? Or maybe you just want to (re)experience it? Here it is, on the internet! The digital age is real.

Have I reblogged this already?


(via bombmagazine)

@peterainsworth - ‘There is a definite sense that digital media has great potential. It is really about using the right tool for the job. I would say that there will be a diverse and eclectic future combining both; maybe even in the same physical object’
@appleJuice_Mag - ’The e-book might not compete as such, because it caters to a different audience. Though that’s not to say it won’t achieve!’
@andreybogush - ’New devices have wonderful screens – for some photographs it can be much nicer medium than traditional paper-based one.’
@phaidon - ’You still can’t beat having a beautifully bound & laid out book just waiting to be opened+explored to viewing images on a screen. Plus, we’ve not found an e-reader yet that has that wonderful new book smell.’
@marcwilsonPhoto  – ‘Ebook immediate & with own interactive possibilities but never a replacement for cherished beauty+texture of a physical book.’
@rzyrzy - ’While ebooks are great &convenient, it just wouldn’t have as inviting a presence as a photobook on my shelf or coffee table.’
@14_19  – ‘Two can co-exist harmoniously… @MappEditions, @nolayout, booksonline.fr are all exploring the diff. boundaries of the medium.’
(via Wandering Bears Collective)

@peterainsworth - ‘There is a definite sense that digital media has great potential. It is really about using the right tool for the job. I would say that there will be a diverse and eclectic future combining both; maybe even in the same physical object’

@appleJuice_Mag - ’The e-book might not compete as such, because it caters to a different audience. Though that’s not to say it won’t achieve!’

@andreybogush - ’New devices have wonderful screens – for some photographs it can be much nicer medium than traditional paper-based one.’

@phaidon - ’You still can’t beat having a beautifully bound & laid out book just waiting to be opened+explored to viewing images on a screen. Plus, we’ve not found an e-reader yet that has that wonderful new book smell.’

@marcwilsonPhoto  – ‘Ebook immediate & with own interactive possibilities but never a replacement for cherished beauty+texture of a physical book.’

@rzyrzy - ’While ebooks are great &convenient, it just wouldn’t have as inviting a presence as a photobook on my shelf or coffee table.’

@14_19  – ‘Two can co-exist harmoniously… @MappEditions@nolayout, booksonline.fr are all exploring the diff. boundaries of the medium.’

(via Wandering Bears Collective)


Some serious debate action when down between @kristiannedrake & @davewyatt which kept us glued to our twitter feed all day long! Here are a few of our favourite responses throughout the day:
@blinkzine - ”I agree, but not a concern because bad books will be lost and forgotten…”
@whiteheadollie  – “A ‘book’ should be an artifact, and traditionally it had to be earned, now anybody can do it and this has lowered quality.”
@emiliatelese - ”Quality can be plainly seen through looking at the context in which art is produced. No context = shallow art.”
@rzyrzy - “Quality work is still being produced, it just probably takes a lot more digging to find it now.”
@hello_marcbaker - ”Yes. I think the lack of quality is born from the want to publish something quickly, but I don’t think it’s a concern.”
@caferoyalbooks – “Yes…and no. Everything is becoming easier and so more people are able to do more things. Publishing is one, taking photos is another. It doesn’t concern me. @hello_marcbaker I think speed can bring about lack or quality, however it is very possible to produce something high quality, fast. @whiteheadollie Gill, Gottlund, Fowler, ..all make amazing books. Amazing content and quality. That’s one way of working, I actually quite like disposable / ephemeral materials, especially when it’s made to the highest of standards – that’s why I do what I do. I don’t fetishise over litho printed hardbacks [not that theres anything wrong with that, it’s just one way of working, of many].”
Follow the action for tomorrows question here & here
(via Wandering Bears Collective)

Some serious debate action when down between @kristiannedrake & @davewyatt which kept us glued to our twitter feed all day long! Here are a few of our favourite responses throughout the day:

@blinkzine - ”I agree, but not a concern because bad books will be lost and forgotten…”

@whiteheadollie  – “A ‘book’ should be an artifact, and traditionally it had to be earned, now anybody can do it and this has lowered quality.”

@emiliatelese - ”Quality can be plainly seen through looking at the context in which art is produced. No context = shallow art.”

@rzyrzy - “Quality work is still being produced, it just probably takes a lot more digging to find it now.”

@hello_marcbaker - ”Yes. I think the lack of quality is born from the want to publish something quickly, but I don’t think it’s a concern.”

@caferoyalbooks – “Yes…and no. Everything is becoming easier and so more people are able to do more things. Publishing is one, taking photos is another. It doesn’t concern me. @hello_marcbaker I think speed can bring about lack or quality, however it is very possible to produce something high quality, fast. @whiteheadollie Gill, Gottlund, Fowler, ..all make amazing books. Amazing content and quality. That’s one way of working, I actually quite like disposable / ephemeral materials, especially when it’s made to the highest of standards – that’s why I do what I do. I don’t fetishise over litho printed hardbacks [not that theres anything wrong with that, it’s just one way of working, of many].”

Follow the action for tomorrows question here & here

(via Wandering Bears Collective)