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"Stick a bunch of photographers together and half the time they will start arguing about what is real, what is true, what is art, what is documentary, what is ethical, what is allowed (not much), what isn’t allowed (almost everything), what is elitist, what isn’t. These are all vitally important issues, but there is only so much time of the day that one should spend on them."


(via photographsonthebrain)
Went to this photobook meetup on friday, organized by Bryan Formhals, Joerg Colberg, and Noah Kalina. I brought the Gabriel Orozco book. Here’s a photo of my presenting it, an odd mid-sentence expression on my face.
Can’t wait ‘till the next photobook event!

Here’s a partial list of the books that were presented (next time we’ll make sure to get a full list.)
Rockaway, NY – Roe EthridgeEdges – Dolores MaratA – Greg HalpernPortraits of Native America Life – Edward CurtisSightwalk – Gueorgui PinkhassovA Road Divided – Todd HidoOne Thousand – Phillip Lorca diCorciaRedheaded Peckerwood – Christian PattersonLiberia Retold – Tim HetheringtonThe Printed Picture – Richard BensonIt’s all good – BoogiePhotographs – Gabriel OrozcoMoll 31 – Wiebke LoeperWhite Sea Black Sea – Jens Olof LastheinEarth From Above – Yann Arthus-Bertrand

(via A Photobook Friday in Brooklyn | LPV Magazine)

"The most interesting bloggers and editors write about the projects and work they’re featuring. They tell us why it’s important, why they appreciate it or an idea it evokes. As a photographer telling the stories behind the photos, adding context, narrative and generally presenting your audience with something new and original about the work will be more engaging, and more creatively rewarding for yourself I believe. That’s what I’d like to see more of from photographers and publishers and I don’t think I’m alone. We should strive to not only showcase the work, but to provide new insights and stories about it."

"It seems like half the people on the Internet have come down with the web equivalent of Asperger’s Syndrome: they think that they may blindly speak the truth as they see it with no regard to other people’s feelings and that people should not take offense simply because they are speaking their mind. Well, sorry, Charlie, that’s not how people work. At least, not the emotionally whole ones. Artists can’t expect everyone to like their work. But their audience also has no reason to expect the artist to accept obnoxious and gratuitously rude behavior."


I think a lot of people who take photographs like that, they don’t know how to enjoy things without a camera. They use that as a way to have a good time—that’s what they think a good time is, because they don’t know how to have a good time, basically.
—Robert Mapplethorpe, BOMB 22, 1988

I think a lot of people who take photographs like that, they don’t know how to enjoy things without a camera. They use that as a way to have a good time—that’s what they think a good time is, because they don’t know how to have a good time, basically.

—Robert Mapplethorpe, BOMB 22, 1988


(via bombmagazine)
thetouristzine:

Tumblr Tourism is a ‘Follower Post’ we intend to issue each Friday that will highlight the work of those who follow this blog. We’re humbled by your interest in The Tourist and intend to reciprocate this interest by promoting the work of our Followers (as well as linking to their individual Tumblr accounts). In theory, we’ll utilize a mosaic of four images (as pictured above) to introduce work and the respective artist that created it. So, let’s try this puppy out! Paolo Giacco (top left) is an emerging Toronto-area photographer with an eye for quiet scenes (who first picked up a camera last December). Kansas City-based photographer Patrice Jackson (top right) excels at documentary-styled portraiture that is often whimsical and captures introspection within her subjects. Brooks Reynolds (bottom left) is a photographer from Burlington, ON that combines thoughtful mise-en-scène with technical mastery to produce exceptionally sharp portraits. Nina Perlman is a New York-based photographer whose wonderfully warm work brims with lovely, saturated colors. Hope you liked the first installment of Tumblr Tourism. Let us know your thoughts!

thetouristzine:

Tumblr Tourism is a ‘Follower Post’ we intend to issue each Friday that will highlight the work of those who follow this blog. We’re humbled by your interest in The Tourist and intend to reciprocate this interest by promoting the work of our Followers (as well as linking to their individual Tumblr accounts). In theory, we’ll utilize a mosaic of four images (as pictured above) to introduce work and the respective artist that created it. So, let’s try this puppy out! Paolo Giacco (top left) is an emerging Toronto-area photographer with an eye for quiet scenes (who first picked up a camera last December). Kansas City-based photographer Patrice Jackson (top right) excels at documentary-styled portraiture that is often whimsical and captures introspection within her subjects. Brooks Reynolds (bottom left) is a photographer from Burlington, ON that combines thoughtful mise-en-scène with technical mastery to produce exceptionally sharp portraits. Nina Perlman is a New York-based photographer whose wonderfully warm work brims with lovely, saturated colors. Hope you liked the first installment of Tumblr Tourism. Let us know your thoughts!


(via thetouristzine)

I also received this gorgeous print from wonderfully talented photographer Randall Phenning (this photobooth pic doesn’t do the image justice at all)

along with some pages of hand-written interview questions.

gonna get crackin’ on these questions right away and send a print back in his direction.

"However, what about the emotional connection that we have with our subject matter? Can that have anything to do with our disappointment? My answer is yes.Think about it. When are the times that we experience the biggest disappointment? It’s when we have the highest expectations and emotional investment or response from a situation. If something doesn’t happen exactly the way we want it to, we often find ourselves let down by how the situation actually transpired. That’s human nature, and since creative photography is so closely tuned to our inner selves, it’s only natural to think that the same thing can happen to our image making. We tend to seek out and photograph those subjects that evoke a strong emotional response within ourselves, and the images that we make of those subjects usually end up being our best photographs. However, as is often the case with beginning photographers, they can also be our worst, most uninspired images. Why? because we’re unable to separate our emotional attachment to a subject from the craft of how to make a good photograph, or we fail to produce an image that speaks to that emotional attachment. It’s also because we sometimes forget that a strong photograph is not simply an exact copy of the subject, it’s a symbolic representation of the subject matter that’s designed to invoke an emotional response from us and our viewers. A good photograph isn’t just a picture of “the thing” or “the place,” it tells a story and transports us to a different time and place. It causes us to think “why,” “how,” “where” and “what if?”"