new-aesthetic:


“Someone worked really hard to make the language just right, just the way they wanted it. They were so sure of it that they printed it in ink, on paper. A screen always feels like we could delete that, change that, move it around. So for a literature-crazed person like me, it’s just not permanent enough.” [Jonathan Franzen]
[Franzen’s] speech raised heated discussions in newspaper columns and on the internet. The focus was mainly on defending technology and e-books as a viable and improved evolution, and on how he was being retrograde.  What was missing from the discourse was the fact that technology has also violently altered printed books in a way from which there is no return. We are so disconnected from the means of production that nobody seems to be aware that books are produced very differently then they were 100 years ago. Digital files are exchanged between writers, publishers and printers all over the world.
In the context of the Piracy Project, which we initiated in London in 2010, we discovered cases, which not only took control over the object, but over the content. Inspired by Daniel Alarcon’s article in Granta magazine, “Life Among Pirates”, we traveled to Peru and discovered, for instance, a pirated version of Jaime Bayly’s novel No se lo digas a nadie with two extra chapters added. This physical object may look obviously pirated to a trained eye but could easily pass as the original if you were not looking for differences. The extra chapters are good, good enough to pass undetected by readers. 

Rhizome | The Impermanent Book

new-aesthetic:

“Someone worked really hard to make the language just right, just the way they wanted it. They were so sure of it that they printed it in ink, on paper. A screen always feels like we could delete that, change that, move it around. So for a literature-crazed person like me, it’s just not permanent enough.” [Jonathan Franzen]

[Franzen’s] speech raised heated discussions in newspaper columns and on the internet. The focus was mainly on defending technology and e-books as a viable and improved evolution, and on how he was being retrograde.  What was missing from the discourse was the fact that technology has also violently altered printed books in a way from which there is no return. We are so disconnected from the means of production that nobody seems to be aware that books are produced very differently then they were 100 years ago. Digital files are exchanged between writers, publishers and printers all over the world.

In the context of the Piracy Project, which we initiated in London in 2010, we discovered cases, which not only took control over the object, but over the content. Inspired by Daniel Alarcon’s article in Granta magazine, “Life Among Pirates”, we traveled to Peru and discovered, for instance, a pirated version of Jaime Bayly’s novel No se lo digas a nadie with two extra chapters added. This physical object may look obviously pirated to a trained eye but could easily pass as the original if you were not looking for differences. The extra chapters are good, good enough to pass undetected by readers. 

Rhizome | The Impermanent Book

christopherschreck:

friday @ printed matter nyc

christopherschreck:

friday @ printed matter nyc

Run Away With Alec Soth - Page - Interview Magazine

O’REILLY: Why are books such an important vessel for your photos?

SOTH: I’m a project-based photographer; I think in narrative terms, the way a writer thinks of a book, or a filmmaker a film. The thing about a book is that you can control the entire shape of it, unlike an exhibition where the parameters always change; you might have three rooms in one and one room in the next.

Are electronic media making us less (or more) literate? – CNN.com Blogs

Plato reported in 360 B.C., for instance, that Socrates was concerned about the “forgetfulness” that the technology of writing would produce in the souls of those who learned it, and numerous scholars in the 15th and 16th centuries expressed worries about the changes that would result from the wide dissemination of texts made possible by print.

Writing certainly changed the ways that knowledge was shared, and print made possible its wide distribution, but no one today would say that writing or print made us less able to communicate effectively. Nonetheless, many people do assume today that technologies like text messaging and Facebook, which make communication so easy, are causing a deterioration in actual communication skills, especially among students.

Part of the problem is that “writing” is still seen by many as “producing words on paper,” just as “reading” may still be associated primarily with “books.” Such equations run the risk of blinding us to what’s actually happening in contemporary culture. Students today may read fewer printed books, but that doesn’t mean “no one reads anymore.” In fact, there are many more opportunities for reading today than there have ever been, more platforms and devices and formats and spaces in which we are all constantly engaged in the process of consuming and interpreting text.

Rather than producing a decline in writing (and in writing abilities), the spread of digital platforms and mobile devices has led to an explosion in opportunities for writing. … The challenge for all of us - students, parents and educators alike - is to understand that these modes of online writing with which so many people engage today are writing. Rather than dismissing these digital exchanges as silly or superficial, we should put them to work for us. It might turn out that these new forms provide important benefits for learning today. For instance, having students write blog posts instead of traditional research papers might raise the stakes of writing as a form of communication by providing students with an audience beyond the instructor. When more people can read and respond to a piece of writing, the writing takes on that much more importance.

The question of audience is paramount. Writing online can allow students to engage with many different audiences, leading to an understanding that the appropriateness of various modes of communication has as much to do with the audience that writing seeks to reach as it does with “correctness” in any narrow sense. The kinds of abbreviations and slang and, shall we say, creative spelling used in text-messaging with one’s friends don’t belong in formal presentations of research. This is not because those inventions are wrong, however, but because they’re not taking audience into account.

Just as the English language has never been static, it has also never been singular: We all speak multiple “Englishes,” depending on the audience. The trick is to find ways to inspire today’s students to put those multiple Englishes to work so that they can become as fluent as possible in the many modes of communication available today.

Where am I?

Where am I?

artistsspace:

Opening March 2012
Artists Space: Books & Talks

artistsspace:

Opening March 2012

Artists Space: Books & Talks

The Bookstore’s Last Stand

What publishers count on from bookstores is the browsing effect. Surveys indicate that only a third of the people who step into a bookstore and walk out with a book actually arrived with the specific desire to buy one.

“That display space they have in the store is really one of the most valuable places that exists in this country for communicating to the consumer that a book is a big deal,” said Madeline McIntosh, president of sales, operations and digital for Random House.

What’s more, sales of older books — the so-called backlist, which has traditionally accounted for anywhere from 30 to 50 percent of the average big publisher’s sales — would suffer terribly.

“For all publishers, it’s really important that brick-and-mortar retailers survive,” said David Shanks, the chief executive of the Penguin Group USA. “Not only are they key to keeping our physical book business thriving, there is also the carry-on effect of the display of a book that contributes to selling e-books and audio books. The more visibility a book has, the more inclined a reader is to make a purchase.”

Carolyn Reidy, president and chief executive of Simon & Schuster, says the biggest challenge is to give people a reason to step into Barnes & Noble stores in the first place. “They have figured out how to use the store to sell e-books,” she said of the company. “Now, hopefully, we can figure out how to make that go full circle and see how the e-books can sell the print books.”

(Source: mossfull)

(via slushy)

Medium Agnostic: Project Projects on “Invalid Format” - Triple Canopy

IL: One trope of Project Projects’ book designs is the effort to make visible or expose the issues being dealt with by the contents, whether through typographical selection or the physical construction of the book.

PK: A book ought to not only document its contents but actually perform or enact its contents. In an ideal case, those things are so seamlessly integrated that sometimes it’s hard to tease out the content from the form.

IL: I’m curious about your comment that the best space for contemplative long-form reading is still the physical book, in light of Triple Canopy’s attempt to make a case for an immersive digital reading experience.

PK: One of the things I find commendable about Triple Canopy is that it questions and is critical of accepted paradigms, and is trying to create a Web space for reading that is contemplative. But this doesn’t always work better than the codex, and there are many text pieces in Invalid Formatthat are much more legible in this form. Of course, there are also interactive pieces on the website that are quite hard to translate to print. In those cases, the book becomes a reference. Hopefully this sense of translation between mediums will work in two directions—there is artwork that obviously can’t be represented in a black and white book, and so you end up being led back to the website. The experience becomes richer and more recursive through this.

Apple to announce tools, platform to "digitally destroy" textbook publishing

Apple is slated to announce the fruits of its labor on improving the use of technology in education at its special media event on Thursday, January 19. While speculation has so far centered on digital textbooks, sources close to the matter have confirmed to Ars that Apple will announce tools to help create interactive e-books—the “GarageBand for e-books,” so to speak—and expand its current platform to distribute them to iPhone and iPad users.

At the same time, however, authoring standards-compliant e-books (despite some promises to the contrary) is not as simple as running a Word document of a manuscript through a filter. The current state of software tools continues to frustrate authors and publishers alike, with several authors telling Ars that they wish Apple or some other vendor would make a simple app that makes the process as easy as creating a song in GarageBand.

Our sources say Apple will announce such a tool on Thursday.

ARTISTS' BOOK NOT ARTISTS' BOOK : Boo-Hooray

An exhibition featuring books that are, and/or, are not, artists’ books. Co-curated by Johan Kugelberg and Jeremy Sanders.

Open 12-6pm, seven days a week, January 18 to February 12, at Boo-Hooray Gallery, 265 Canal Street, 6th floor (between Broadway and Lafayette).

ARTISTS’ BOOK NOT ARTISTS’ BOOKIncludes work by Chris Burden, Ira Cohen, Richard Meltzer, John Baldessari, Seth Price, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Richard Hell, Tina Lhotsky, Sue Williams, Tom Sachs, Richard Prince, William Gibson, David Wojnarowicz, Dara Birnbaum, Jim Shaw, Ed Ruscha, Sean Landers, and others (not to mention, Various, Anonymous, and Unknown). Publication forthcoming.

bombmagazine:

This is a great discussion for folks interested in digital age publishing, wish we could have made it!

mcnallyjackson:

Missed our (Re)making Media panel on DIY, zines, punk rock, gen X and millenials in the digital age? Or maybe you just want to (re)experience it? Here it is, on the internet! The digital age is real.

Have I reblogged this already?

phot(o)lia: how to make a book with steidl.

photolia:

How to make a book with Steidl.

2010. Germany. Gereon Wetzel, Jorg Adolph. 88 min.

 If you love photography books (or/and books), you have to watch this wonderful documentary! This is a beautiful film about German publisher Gerhard Steidl, and his incredible passion, love and…

For Libraries and Publishers, an E-Book Tug of War - NYTimes.com

in some ways this doesn’t really make complete sense to me..

The Future of the Book. from IDEO on Vimeo.

(via Future of the Book | IDEO)

The Future of the Book is a design exploration of digital reading that seeks to identify new opportunities for readers, publishers, and authors to discover, consume, and connect in different formats.

As more people consume pages in pixels, IDEO designers wondered why we continue to discover and consume the written word through the old analog, page-turning model. We asked: what happens when the reading experience catches up with new technologies?

The team looked at how digital and analog books currently are being read, shared and collected, as well as at trends, business models and consumer behavior within related fields. We identified three distinct opportunities—new narratives, social reading with richer context, and providing tools for critical thinking—and developed a design concept around each one.

Each concept features a simple, accessible storytelling format and a particular look and feel. We believe that digital technology creates possibilities, so our solutions truly adapt to the new environment, rather than emulate analog qualities onscreen. For example, we resisted any temptation to move books closer to the bite-sized character of other digital media, because longhand writing encourages immersion (deep reading) and reflection.