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christopherschreck:

MEDIUM: 2 - HOW TO INTERNET
new one i wrote for LPV magazine
a blog post about art and social media, looking at work dealing with art and social media, now disseminated through an artist’s social media
includes work by Brad Troemel, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Louis Doulas, Dan Abbe, Ben Vickers, Anthony Antonellis, and Chris Dorley-Brown

…“The artist’s online brand tends to function as a kind of live-action role playing artist statement… a vehicle for creating an authorial context that viewers may use to better understand the vantage point an artist’s ‘actual’ work is coming from (i.e. what they’d exhibit in a gallery or show on their portfolio website).”

I’ve seen/heard numerous creatives say as much about their own approach to social media, and I wonder if it’s not a potentially useful development. Gaining a sense of an artist’s work via status updates and blog posts is, admittedly, a less direct, less coherent process than simply reading an artist statement. But so what?  For those users willing to pay attention and connect their own dots, the “live-action artist statement” model provides a great deal of functional context for an artist’s work – and, as an audience member, sounds to me like a far more engaging and liberating prospect than trudging through an obligatory written text. (Which isn’t to say that we’d benefit from the outright abandonment of artist statements – it’s important that creatives be capable of developing and presenting articulate accounts of what they’re doing – but I do think the authors present a pretty interesting idea here.) …

christopherschreck:

MEDIUM: 2 - HOW TO INTERNET

new one i wrote for LPV magazine

a blog post about art and social media, looking at work dealing with art and social media, now disseminated through an artist’s social media

includes work by Brad Troemel, Jaakko Pallasvuo, Louis Doulas, Dan Abbe, Ben Vickers, Anthony Antonellis, and Chris Dorley-Brown


  • “The artist’s online brand tends to function as a kind of live-action role playing artist statement… a vehicle for creating an authorial context that viewers may use to better understand the vantage point an artist’s ‘actual’ work is coming from (i.e. what they’d exhibit in a gallery or show on their portfolio website).”
I’ve seen/heard numerous creatives say as much about their own approach to social media, and I wonder if it’s not a potentially useful development. Gaining a sense of an artist’s work via status updates and blog posts is, admittedly, a less direct, less coherent process than simply reading an artist statement. But so what?  For those users willing to pay attention and connect their own dots, the “live-action artist statement” model provides a great deal of functional context for an artist’s work – and, as an audience member, sounds to me like a far more engaging and liberating prospect than trudging through an obligatory written text. (Which isn’t to say that we’d benefit from the outright abandonment of artist statements – it’s important that creatives be capable of developing and presenting articulate accounts of what they’re doing – but I do think the authors present a pretty interesting idea here.) 

(via christopherschreck)

"Mr. Larson, a photographer who teaches photography at the Maryland Institute College of Art, has been working with Marni Shindelman, a Rochester-based photographer, for more than two years on a project using location coordinates to combine Twitter messages with photos from the places where the posts originated. Mr. Larson calls the pairings, many of which have a melancholic feel, “anonymous tributes to anonymous people.”"


(via photographsonthebrain)

"I welcome the eager, the ambitious, the hungry, those delirious and desirous to forage into the unknown. Young, old, naive, established, I want to hear from you. I want to hear about your crazy ideas. I want to be bored by your stupid ideas. I want to engage in philosophical conversations with you about memory, history, technology and the nature of photography. I want something new. I want to be challenged. I want your energy to frighten me. I want to sit down with you in a pub, in your town, on your time, on my dime. We’ll make things right, we’ll make things happen."


(via photographsonthebrain)
Went to this photobook meetup on friday, organized by Bryan Formhals, Joerg Colberg, and Noah Kalina. I brought the Gabriel Orozco book. Here’s a photo of my presenting it, an odd mid-sentence expression on my face.
Can’t wait ‘till the next photobook event!

Here’s a partial list of the books that were presented (next time we’ll make sure to get a full list.)
Rockaway, NY – Roe EthridgeEdges – Dolores MaratA – Greg HalpernPortraits of Native America Life – Edward CurtisSightwalk – Gueorgui PinkhassovA Road Divided – Todd HidoOne Thousand – Phillip Lorca diCorciaRedheaded Peckerwood – Christian PattersonLiberia Retold – Tim HetheringtonThe Printed Picture – Richard BensonIt’s all good – BoogiePhotographs – Gabriel OrozcoMoll 31 – Wiebke LoeperWhite Sea Black Sea – Jens Olof LastheinEarth From Above – Yann Arthus-Bertrand

(via A Photobook Friday in Brooklyn | LPV Magazine)

"The most interesting bloggers and editors write about the projects and work they’re featuring. They tell us why it’s important, why they appreciate it or an idea it evokes. As a photographer telling the stories behind the photos, adding context, narrative and generally presenting your audience with something new and original about the work will be more engaging, and more creatively rewarding for yourself I believe. That’s what I’d like to see more of from photographers and publishers and I don’t think I’m alone. We should strive to not only showcase the work, but to provide new insights and stories about it."

"Photographers get too caught up in their routines and mental patterns. Everything becomes planned, almost scientific. Chance, luck, fate, messing with it all. You’ve got to do it. You’ve got to mess with your reality, mess with your own brain to really make something unique."


(via bloodoftheyoung)

"Photographers get too caught up in their routines and mental patterns. Everything becomes planned, almost scientific. Chance, luck, fate, messing with it all. You’ve got to do it. You’ve got to mess with your reality, mess with your own brain to really make something unique."


(via photographsonthebrain)