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June, 2014

June, 2014

June, 2014

June, 2014

"The desire to see the city preceded the means of satisfying it. Medieval or Renaissance painters represented the city as seen in a perspective that no eye had yet enjoyed. This fictional already made the medieval spectator into a celestial eye. It created gods…The same scopic drive haunts users of architectural productions by materializing the utopia that yesterday was only painted. The 1370 foot high tower that serves as a prow for Manhattan continues construct the fiction that creates readers, makes the complexity of the city readable, and immobilizes its opaque mobility in a transparent text."

…”The ordinary practitioners of the city live ‘down below,’ below the thresholds at which visibility begins…they are walkers whose bodies follow the thicks and thins of an urban ‘text’ they write without being able to read it…The networks of these moving, intersecting writings compose a manifold story that has neither author nor spectator, shaped out in fragments of trajectories and alterations of spaces: in relation to representations, it remains daily and indefinitely other.”

(Source: faculty.georgetown.edu)

"the fiction of knowledge is related to this lust to be a viewpoint and nothing more."

theparisreview:

“I want my translation to be something impossible yet extant, something existing on the border of two utterly incompatible worlds, and yet to be a bridge between those worlds. I want the reader of the English version to feel the same shock I felt when reading the original. I don’t want to make it easy or acceptable, or to over-domesticate the text. There is an incredible poetry in the Hungarian language. Sometimes it’s infinitely gentle, sometimes it’s savage poetry.”
An interview with translator Ottilie Mulzet on László Krasznahorkai.

theparisreview:

“I want my translation to be something impossible yet extant, something existing on the border of two utterly incompatible worlds, and yet to be a bridge between those worlds. I want the reader of the English version to feel the same shock I felt when reading the original. I don’t want to make it easy or acceptable, or to over-domesticate the text. There is an incredible poetry in the Hungarian language. Sometimes it’s infinitely gentle, sometimes it’s savage poetry.”

An interview with translator Ottilie Mulzet on László Krasznahorkai.


(via theparisreview)
wearelucky:

The Doomed Polaroid show
Doomed Gallery submission call: Polaroid Photography has been an interest to the alternative since it hit the photography world in the 1948 with one simple quote ”Why can’t I see them now?”. Used in all walks of life, from police reports to Fashion to porn and with the rise of the snapshot culture, Polaroid has been something we have loved and treasured for many years and for 3 days this September, Doomed wants to celebrate everything polaroid.
We are inviting polaroid photographers and collectors to submit to the DOOMED POLAROID SHOW on the 12/13/14 of September,
All submission must be sent by email, scanned at 21cm Longest edge at 300 dpi. Please email your submission to polaroid@doomedgallery.com 
There is no theme. Submit anything and everything.
Please state your full name, Location and contact details in the email.
File names should be displayed as so: FIRSTNAME_LASTNAME.Jpeg
DEADLINE 29th of AUGUST
Please share

wearelucky:

The Doomed Polaroid show

Doomed Gallery submission call: Polaroid Photography has been an interest to the alternative since it hit the photography world in the 1948 with one simple quote ”Why can’t I see them now?”. Used in all walks of life, from police reports to Fashion to porn and with the rise of the snapshot culture, Polaroid has been something we have loved and treasured for many years and for 3 days this September, Doomed wants to celebrate everything polaroid.

We are inviting polaroid photographers and collectors to submit to the DOOMED POLAROID SHOW on the 12/13/14 of September,

All submission must be sent by email, scanned at 21cm Longest edge at 300 dpi. Please email your submission to polaroid@doomedgallery.com 

There is no theme. Submit anything and everything.

Please state your full name, Location and contact details in the email.

File names should be displayed as so: FIRSTNAME_LASTNAME.Jpeg

DEADLINE 29th of AUGUST

Please share


(via wearelucky)

Thinking about structures of language and architecture

stillhouse:

Tonight

stillhouse:

Tonight


(via stillhouse)
rock512devil:

Devil is proud to present Impossible Eye, an exhibition by Miranda Pfeiffer and Ginevra Shay. Please Join us for an opening reception on Saturday, June 28th from 7:00 - 10:00PM Since 2011, Miranda has worked almost exclusively with mechanical pencil on paper, developing a unique approach to hatching and illusionism, in a series of large, panoramic landscapes, Solitary Stones. In her new series Rock Line, Pfeiffer scales down to two and three-foot square drawings, rendering situations both imagined and observed. If Solitary Stones created an immersive narrative through spatial depth and composition, then Rock Line depicts what can be understood of a drawing in an instant. By including the corner of one’s eye, the tip of one’s nose or finger, Miranda’s drawings simulate the immediate vantage point of a human body.  Trained in darkroom photography, Ginevra abandoned the camera as a documentation tool and began working with materials on light sensitive paper to explore the minute interactions between materiality and process. Raum Bilder, her most recent series combines collage and diorama to establish a dynamic space in which the prescribed meaning or use of images – collected from advertisements and mass-produced publications – is dissolved. These photographs explore the tonal quality, form, and texture of each image and use them like a paint stroke, or ground to build new meaning and purpose within the diorama. Through this process, Shay is able to explore photography as a material in unique object making. A conversation between the artists began in November of 2013 that focused on the deviation from realism in their respective practices. In their new series, both Pfeiffer and Shay return to the tendencies of Paleolithic art described by Arnold Hauser in A Social History of Art:  “It was a technique without mystery, a matter-of-fact procedure, the objective application of methods, which had as little to do with mysticism and esoterism as when we set mousetraps, manure the ground, or take a drug. The pictures were part of the technical apparatus of this magic; they were the “trap” into which the game had to go, or rather they were the trap with the already captured animal—for the picture was both representation and the things represented, both wish and wish-fulfillment at one and the same time. “ Impossible Eye marks a convergence of optic and haptic senses, through textural and spatial illusionism and the material associations of imagery. Literal and direct, the artist’s processes construct these other worlds without ceremony. Ginevra Shay (b. 1987, Washington, DC) is an artist and curator who studied Studio Art and Art History at the University of Vermont. Ginevra’s work has been exhibited and published nationally and internationally. She participated in recent exhibitions at The Finnish Museum of Photography (Finland), Notre Dame University (Maryland), John Hansard Gallery (United Kingdom), Maryland Art Place (Baltimore), and Guest Spot (Baltimore). Her publications are in the libraries of The International Center for Photography, Indie Photobook Library, Houston Center for Photography, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.Miranda Pfeiffer is an artist and animator. She has shown at Commune1 in Capetown South Africa, Open Space in Baltimore, Maryland, and Vox Populi in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is a Kenan Fellow and a recipient of the Nancy Harrican Prize, given through the Baker Artist Fund. Currently, she is living in Los Angeles California.

rock512devil:

Devil is proud to present Impossible Eye, an exhibition by Miranda Pfeiffer and Ginevra Shay. Please Join us for an opening reception on Saturday, June 28th from 7:00 - 10:00PM

Since 2011, Miranda has worked almost exclusively with mechanical pencil on paper, developing a unique approach to hatching and illusionism, in a series of large, panoramic landscapes, Solitary Stones. In her new series Rock Line, Pfeiffer scales down to two and three-foot square drawings, rendering situations both imagined and observed. If Solitary Stones created an immersive narrative through spatial depth and composition, then Rock Line depicts what can be understood of a drawing in an instant. By including the corner of one’s eye, the tip of one’s nose or finger, Miranda’s drawings simulate the immediate vantage point of a human body.

Trained in darkroom photography, Ginevra abandoned the camera as a documentation tool and began working with materials on light sensitive paper to explore the minute interactions between materiality and process. Raum Bilder, her most recent series combines collage and diorama to establish a dynamic space in which the prescribed meaning or use of images – collected from advertisements and mass-produced publications – is dissolved. These photographs explore the tonal quality, form, and texture of each image and use them like a paint stroke, or ground to build new meaning and purpose within the diorama. Through this process, Shay is able to explore photography as a material in unique object making.

A conversation between the artists began in November of 2013 that focused on the deviation from realism in their respective practices. In their new series, both Pfeiffer and Shay return to the tendencies of Paleolithic art described by Arnold Hauser in A Social History of Art:

“It was a technique without mystery, a matter-of-fact procedure, the objective application of methods, which had as little to do with mysticism and esoterism as when we set mousetraps, manure the ground, or take a drug. The pictures were part of the technical apparatus of this magic; they were the “trap” into which the game had to go, or rather they were the trap with the already captured animal—for the picture was both representation and the things represented, both wish and wish-fulfillment at one and the same time. “

Impossible Eye marks a convergence of optic and haptic senses, through textural and spatial illusionism and the material associations of imagery. Literal and direct, the artist’s processes construct these other worlds without ceremony.

Ginevra Shay (b. 1987, Washington, DC) is an artist and curator who studied Studio Art and Art History at the University of Vermont. Ginevra’s work has been exhibited and published nationally and internationally. She participated in recent exhibitions at The Finnish Museum of Photography (Finland), Notre Dame University (Maryland), John Hansard Gallery (United Kingdom), Maryland Art Place (Baltimore), and Guest Spot (Baltimore). Her publications are in the libraries of The International Center for Photography, Indie Photobook Library, Houston Center for Photography, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Miranda Pfeiffer is an artist and animator. She has shown at Commune1 in Capetown South Africa, Open Space in Baltimore, Maryland, and Vox Populi in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is a Kenan Fellow and a recipient of the Nancy Harrican Prize, given through the Baker Artist Fund. Currently, she is living in Los Angeles California.


(via bonerevolution)
newmuseum:

“Camille Henrot: The Restless Earth" is on view through June 29.
mattjayblog:

#camillehenrot (and lykke li sitting on the bench)


I still need to see this

newmuseum:

Camille Henrot: The Restless Earth" is on view through June 29.

mattjayblog:

#camillehenrot (and lykke li sitting on the bench)

I still need to see this


(via newmuseum)